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August Full Moon Herb Highlight

This month's post is all about Dill. Dill makes me happy. Stretching towards the sky and exploding in a burst of yellow flowers I’ve always thought of it as the fireworks display of the garden. This easy to grow, generous, happy plant is beloved by home canners and pollinators alike. There are few smells and tastes that summon hot summer months more than Dill.


Anethum graveolens is a member of the Apiaceae family of plants characterized by a cluster of flowers known as an umbel - see how they radiate out from a single stem like an umbrella. Dill is chock full of volatile oils, coumarins, and phenolic acids. It has a lovely affinity for the digestive system and can be used in nearly all stages and phases of life. It is carminative meaning it helps to dispel gas and bloating. It is also antispasmodic and stomachic - you can begin to see why it has such a great reputation for assisting digestion! Dill is considered a friend to new parents as it is the herb of choice for soothing children’s colic and promotes/stimulates milk production in lactating humans. Although large amounts of dill should be avoided during pregnancy. Chewing the seeds will help clear bad breath and a gargle of seed and plant can be used for inflammation of the mouth and throat.

Magically, Dill is associated with money, protection, luck and lust. That’s some range, ha! I found one reference that said if hung over the door no one, “Ill-disposed or envious of you can enter your house.” A bath of Dill is believed to make a person irresistible...perhaps you can give it a try on your next date night. Ha!

In my garden, Dill is often full of delightful Swallowtail Butterfly caterpillars. Indeed I plant extra to make sure we have enough to share! In the kitchen it pairs beautifully with anything pickled. While cucumbers are the obvious favorites, I like to add dill to my root veggies like radish and beets. I invite you all to enjoy the sights, smells, and tastes of summer by bringing a little dill into your life this month! Green Blessings!


References:

Cunningham, S. (2019). Encyclopedia of magical herbs. Woodbury, MN: Llewellyn Publications.

Hoffmann, D. (2003). Medical herbalism: The science and practice of herbal medicine. Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press.

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